It’s official! I’m making some big changes

by Stephen Cobb on July 15, 2019

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I have retired from my job at ESET and we’re moving to England!

While I tried to provide an early warning of this news to as many friends and family as possible, things have been a bit hectic, so it’s possible that I missed you – if so, my apologies.

This blog is  one way to make sure everyone knows, and at the same time provide some back story to these changes.

Retire? Why? How?

After a very enjoyable eight year relationship with ESET, the company at which I’ve worked longer than any other, I began to think it was time to change things up a little, or down a notch, depending on your perspective.

And I knew that – owing to several factors on which I will elaborate later – the change would involve a move. So we began to look at living somewhere other than San Diego.

When Chey and I went to the UK earlier this year – for my mum’s 90th birthday – we arrived at the conclusion that we would like to move closer to her. We now plan to complete our relocation by early September, to a cozy place just a short walk from mum’s flat in Coventry, the thousand year old city in which I was born. And when we’ve unpacked and the dust settles, I expect to be sitting in a comfy chair in small study with a big internet pipe, conducting independent research into the darker aspects of humans and technology.

I will probably reemerge as Stephen Cobb, Independent Researcher. Down the road it could be Stephen Cobb, Public-Interest Technologist. (And I wouldn’t rule out Prof. Cobb since Coventry has two thriving universities and there are several more nearby, including my alma mater, the University of Leicester).

What? When?

Timing is not always everything, but it did play a big role in this set of changes. By the end of 2018 I had reached a point in time that is referred to in America as “full retirement age.” This is when Americans can start receiving the full amount of their pension (if you were born in 1952, that age is currently 66). What I mean by “pension” is Social Security retirement benefit, but we decided to use the term pension because in England “social security” means something quite different.

As 2018 unfolded I began see this pension as a “social retainer,” a way for me to finance a different approach to my life’s work, a chance to labor at my own speed, in my own way. I will write more about that work in a different place, but suffice to say it involves – among other things – helping the world to “enjoy safer technology.” As you may know, that phrase is how ESET – my former employer – frames its mission, and it’s one reason that I worked there so long.

I realized that a pension potentially means being able to choose my own strategy – like writing a book to give substance to the points I want to make, or making those points as an independent voice, not someone employed by a corporate entity (to be clear, ESET had an admirable commitment to objective research and required me to stay “vendor-neutral” in my public speaking – but one ethical company cannot save the reputation of an industry that needs redeeming).

But why did I say: “a pension potentially means being able”? Well, the enabling power of a pension is dependent on the size of that monthly check from the government relative to the cost of living where you live. Exactly how dependent will vary based on your circumstances. All of which turns out to be quite relevant to our decision to move to Coventry in England, as I will now explain.

How much?

The “Too Long, Didn’t Read” version is that the pension checks which Chey and I started to receive this year are not enough to live on in San Diego given that we don’t own a home here. We are members of a fairly large group of people whose assets were wiped out by the Great Recession, so we entered this decade with no savings and no home of our own.

Since 2011, we have lived in rented property in San Diego, where the average rent is now over $2,000 a month. When we moved here we decided to live near the ESET building in Little Italy so that I could walk to work (which costs a lot less than driving, with way less stress). You pay a premium for this location but sadly, Little Italy has become less of a community in recent years, and more of an entertainment district. We have felt it grow less livable even as it has become less affordable, providing additional incentive to move from our current location. (After dozens of moves in the nearly five decades since I left home, I’ve come to see moving across the country or over the ocean to be no more of a pain than moving across town.)

Last year, rents in San Diego as a whole rose 7%, and the average monthly rent in Little Italy is now over $2,400, and still rising. We pay slightly more than that, for a decidedly smaller place than the one we rented for $1,750 when we first moved here in 2011. So, unless you already own property in San Diego, or have managed to accumulate and retain a large nest egg, the prospect of retirement here, however appealing it might seem, is economically infeasible.

Being researchers, we analyzed numerous “more affordable” places after our nest egg was cracked by the Big Bank Fraud (then smashed by the Great Recession and mopped up by the for-profit healthcare industry). Turns out we can live in a nice house in Coventry for less than half what we currently pay in Little Italy. True, Coventry has less than half the number of sunshine hours you get in San Diego, and twice as much rain, but our pensions should be enough to pay the bills plus occasional flights to see my brother in Spain, while keeping us in wax jackets and wellies to boot.

The changes we are making this year have already taught us a lot and as our journey continues I will endeavor to share what we discover along the way. In the meantime, I will be tweeting as @zcobb if you’d like to follow me there.

 

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